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Taught, 2012
Taught, 2012

Taught, 2012

Taught
 

 
Work
 by
 staff
 teaching
 on
 the
 BA
 Honours
 Fine
 Art
 course
 at
 
 
Norwich
 University
 College
 of
 the
 Arts
 

 
Wednesday
 14th
 November
 –
 Friday
 23rd
 November
 09.30-­-17.00
 
Student
 Gallery,
 St
 George’s
 NUCA
 

 
Jo
 Addison
 
  Think-­-thing
 (rainbow)
 
  2012
  MDF,
 Wood,
 Gouache
  420x320x18mm
 
 
  Think-­-thing
 (Rainbow)
 is
 one
 of
 a
 series
 of
 objects
 in
 which
 familiar
 things
 are
 interpreted
 with
 loose
  figuration
 and
 provisional
 materials.
 The
 name
 Think-­-thing
 is
 derived
 from
 John
 Wyndham's
 novel
 The
  Chrysalids,
 in
 which
 a
 group
 of
 children
 growing
 up
 in
 a
 post-­-apocalyptic
 world
 discover
 their
 ability
 to
  communicate
 with
 one
 another
 without
 the
 use
 of
 verbal
 language.
 
 
 
 
 
  Catherine
 Baker
 
  All
  Composite
 drawing
 with
 digichrome
 finish
  280mm
 x
 320mm
 unframed
 
  All
 consists
 of
 six
 layered
 drawings
 brought
 together
 to
 act
 as
 one.
 Individually
 they
 represent
 traces
 of
  eye
 movements
 captured
 when
 drawing,
 duration
 is
 reflected
 through
 the
 size
 of
 the
 marks
 made.
 
  Together
 they
 fuse
 to
 become
 a
 singular
 moment
 that
 reflects
 the
 experience
 of
 making
 all
 of
 the
  drawings,
 creating
 new
 events
 where
 the
 layers
 begin
 to
 correlate
 to
 create
 an
 essence
 rather
 than
 an
  representation.
 


  Jenny
 Dunseath
 
  ‘cones’
 
  ‘cones’
 presents
 us
 with
 a
 scenario
 comprised
 of
 seemingly
 impaired
 approximations
 of
 apparatus.
  Sharply
 rendered
 but
 dumb,
 these
 suggestions
 of
 semi-­-industrial
 equipment,
 lead
 us
 toward
 a
  negotiation
 of
 the
 relationship
 between
 architecture
 and
 sculpture.
 Utilitarian
 materials
 operate
  ambiguously
 as
 their
 original
 behavioural
 traits
 are
 reduced
 to
 mere
 aesthetic.
 
 
 
  The
 sculptural
 works
 combine
 an
 interest
 in
 architecture
 and
 construction
 with
 an
 investment
 in
  minimalist
 sculpture.
 Approached
 as
 discursive
 structures,
 they
 serve
 as
 vehicles
 for
 critical
 claims.
 All
  aspects
 of
 my
 practice
 are
 permeated
 with
 the
 sense
 that
 production
 itself
 is
 the
 product
 and
 not
 a
  past
 process
 to
 be
 hidden.
 
 
  ‘An
 image,
 I’m
 pleased,
 I’m
 sad’
 
  ‘An
 Image,
 I’m
 pleased,
 I’m
 sad’
 is
 an
 epigrammatic
 Gif
 animation,
 which
 explores
 the
 pedagogic
  framework
 of
 the
 exhibition
 in
 relation
 to
 my
 own
 interests
 in
 building
 sites
 and
 development.
 
 
  Coalescent
 images,
 embedded
 within
 the
 framework
 of
 the
 VLE,
 address
 each
 other
 far
 more
 than
 the
  audience
 to
 maintain
 an
 internal
 dialogue.
 Tightly
 choreographed
 and
 repetitive
 ‘An
 image,
 I’m
  pleased,
 I’m
 sad’
 has
 a
 kind
 of
 ‘hyperlink’
 logic;
 one
 link
 following
 another
 and
 the
 next,
 and
 forming
 a
  narrative
 that
 makes
 sense
 only
 according
 to
 its
 specific
 successions,
 repetitions
 and
 changes
 of
  direction.
 The
 title
 refers
 directly
 to
 2
 key
 texts
 by
 Reyner
 Banham
 (New
 Brutalism
 1966
 and
 The
 Great
  Gizmo)
 each
 attempting
 to
 identify
 new
 methods
 and
 ideals
 of
 production
 or
 design.
 As
 Brutalist
  philosophy
 was
 originally
 intended
 by
 its
 proponents
 to
 be
 integrated
 and
 protective,
 similarities
 are
  drawn
 to
 the
 use
 of
 VLE
 as
 vehicle
 for
 modes
 of
 learning
 and
 the
 democratic
 sharing
 of
 information.
  The
 use
 of
 Gifs,
 embrace
 visual
 immediacy
 and
 fast
 pace;
 using
 basic
 present-­-day
 technology,
 it
 is
 of
 a
  time,
 trend
 and
 denotes
 a
 generation.
 
 
 
  Paul
 Fieldsend-­-Danks
 
  Three
 thousand
 miles
 
  Oil
 and
 pencil
 on
 panel
 (diptych)
  600mm
 x
 1200mm
  2012
 
 
  I
 am
 interested
 in
 the
 interpretation
 of
 site
 and
 place,
 as
 memory
 or
 residue
 of
 a
 lost
 moment,
 and
  how
 material
 and
 process
 can
 re-­-establish
 a
 physical
 connection
 with
 a
 nebulous
 past.
 Three
 thousand
  miles
 is
 one
 of
 a
 series
 of
 abstract
 paintings
 inspired
 by
 a
 remarkable
 Scandinavian
 road
 trip
 made
 in
  1958
 by
 my
 father.
 As
 an
 architecture
 student,
 he
 was
 fascinated
 by
 the
 refined
 purity
 of
 Swedish
  farmhouse
 vernacular
 and
 in
 particular
 the
 symbiotic
 relationship
 between
 buildings
 and
 landscape.
  He
 set
 off
 from
 Birmingham
 unaccompanied,
 in
 a
 reconditioned
 1934
 Austin
 Seven,
 travelling
 across
  Europe
 towards
 the
 sparsely
 populated
 wilderness
 of
 northern
 Sweden.
 He
 spent
 arduous
 days
 digging
  squares
 of
 black
 peat
 in
 the
 central
 wetlands,
 to
 fund
 his
 continued
 passage
 and
 to
 allow
 essential
  repairs
 for
 his
 car.
 The
 title
 alludes
 to
 both
 the
 physical
 distance
 and
 endeavour
 of
 his
 journey,
 but
 also
  to
 the
 space
 between
 forgetting
 and
 remembering
 events.
 
 
 
Krzysztof
 Fijalkowski
 

 Transit
 Works
  Collage
 with
 found
 objects,
 2012
  Krzysztof
 Fijalkowski
 
 
  These
 simple,
 deliberately
 lo-­-fi
 pieces
 try
 to
 deal
 with
 the
 problem
 of
 how
 to
 pursue
 a
 practice
 without
  a
 studio,
 resources
 or,
 above
 all,
 time.
 Small-­-scale,
 made
 intuitively
 and
 immediately
 with
 materials
  found
 in
 the
 street
 whilst
 walking
 to
 work
 or
 from
 one
 campus
 building
 to
 another,
 they
 borrow
  Marcel
 Duchamp’s
 ‘infra-­-thin’
 moments
 between
 one
 kind
 of
 labour
 so
 as
 to
 smuggle
 in
 another,
 more
  underhand
 occupation.
 Since
 these
 little
 objects
 tend
 to
 make
 themselves,
 they
 short-­-circuit
 the
  painstaking
 reflection
 and
 craft
 that
 can
 make
 art
 so
 labour-­-intensive.
  Simon
 Granger
 
  The
 work
 is
 a
 small
 painting
 on
 canvas
 30
 x
 24
 cm,
 comprising
 a
 constructed,
 invented,
 modelled
 image
  of
 a
 living
 entity
 featuring
 animal
 and
 human
 elements,
 existing
 within
 a
 depicted
 space.
 The
 painting
  is
 absurd,
 fragile
 and
 vulnerable
 on
 various
 levels;
 this
 fragility
 is
 a
 key
 quality
 that
 the
 image
 serves
 to
  bring
 about.
 
 
 
  Sarah
 Horton
 
  References
 to
 both
 the
 office
 and
 to
 domestic
 environments
 explore
 the
 complicated
 relationships
  between
 work
 and
 home,
 using
 fabric
 and
 decoration
 as
 significant
 components.
 Fabric
 is
 a
 ubiquitous
  material
 usually
 associated
 with
 the
 body
 and
 soft
 furnishings
 and
 used
 with
 other
 materials
 prompts
 a
  number
 of
 possible
 ‘readings’
 within
 the
 work.
 Materials
 and
 objects
 are
 removed
 from
 their
 usual
  contexts
 and
 potential
 functions
 are
 complicated
 by
 some
 implausibility
 or
 contradiction
 of
 the
 objects
  making.
 
 
  October
 2012
 
 
  Kelly
 Large
 
 
  The
 Presence
  2012
  Charismatic
 people,
 an
 exhibition
  Dimensions
 variable
 
 
  Artist
 Kelly
 Large
 has
 invited
 a
 charismatic
 person
 to
 visit
 the
 exhibition
 today.
 
 The
 visitation
 will
 be
  unannounced,
 for
 no
 fixed
 duration
 and
 can
 take
 place
 at
 any
 time.
 
 
 
 
  Victoria
 Mitchell
 
  Notational
 Rambling
 
  Slipping
 between
 and
 across
 boundaries,
 office
 systems
 might
 be
 imagined
 as
 wilderness.
  Notation
 slips
 darkly
 into
 notion
 as
 words
 blur
 into
 graphic
 dust.
  Tentative
 reminders
 yet
 alert
 to
 the
 approaching
 oblivion
 of
 lost
 time.
  The
 loom
 of
 the
 everyday
 unravelling
 to
 reveal
 that
 which
 we
 do
 not
 yet
 know.
 

 
  Flora
 Parrott
 
  It
 Separates
 But
 Merges
 Back
 into
 the
 Same
 Field
 
  This
 is
 the
 new
 beginning
 of
 something
 that
 I
 am
 working
 on
 in
 the
 studio.
 It
 comes
 from
 my
 recent
  Wysing
 residency
 and
 links
 various
 other
 strands
 of
 interest
 together
 for
 me.
 It
 is
 very
 much
 a
 work
 in
  progress
 or
 a
 sketch
 for
 things
 to
 come,
 centred
 upon
 some
 small
 volcanic
 rocks
 and
 a
 steel
 spike.
 
 
 
  Carl
 Rowe
 
  Beautiful
 Worms
 
  Beautiful
 Worms
 is
 an
 arrangement
 of
 screenprinted
 posters
 pasted
 directly
 to
 the
 gallery
 wall.
 It
 is
 a
  work
 that
 attempts
 to
 conflate
 corporal
 mechanics,
 endless
 desire
 and
 capitalism.
 Crudely
 half-­-toned
  images
 are
 superimposed
 with
 the
 words
 Desire,
 Flow,
 Inhibit,
 words
 that
 come
 directly
 from
 Deleuze
  and
 Guattari’s
 ‘Desiring-­-Machines’.
 
 In
 reference
 to
 Deleuze
 and
 Guattari,
 it
 is
 the
 synthesis
 of
 desire
  and
 consumption
 that
 fuels
 capitalism,
 relying
 on
 a
 flow
 of
 production
 and
 a
 continuous,
 varied,
  enticing,
 exotic
 series
 of
 interruptions.
 Below
 the
 posters
 sit
 tubes
 of
 meat
 paste.
 
 
  Andy
 Weir
 
  The
 works
 depart
 from
 a
 play
 on
 taught
 /
 taut
 /
 tort
 and
 the
 etymology
 of
 'tort'
 as
 involving
 twisting,
  turning,
 wringing
 and
 distorting.
 Taut
 or
 twisted
 boundaries
 become
 a
 connecting
 spatial
 dynamic
 for
  the
 two
 pieces.
 One
 takes
 as
 its
 materials
 the
 taut
 parameters
 of
 the
 exhibition
 and
 the
 other
 records
  the
 twists
 of
 geotruama:
 
Threshold
 Point
 II:
 staff
 show
 (masking
 tape;
 2012)
 is
 a
 taut
 line
 keeping
 the
 outside
 out
 -­-
 a
 piece
 of
  tape
 stretched
 across
 the
 space
 between
 the
 staff
 and
 student
 shows.
 It
 is
 part
 of
 a
 series
 of
 works
  that
 take
 the
 format
 of
 the
 exhibition
 as
 their
 material.
 In
 this
 case
 it
 uses
 a
 minimal
 architectural
  gesture
 to
 draw
 attention
 to
 the
 assumption,
 spatially
 enforced,
 that
 the
 staff
 and
 student
 exhibitions
  should
 be
 separated
 and
 occupy
 different
 spaces.
 [Note:
 Unfortunately,
 after
 discussion,
 it
 has
 been
  agreed
 to
 remove
 the
 work
 on
 Health
 and
 Safety
 grounds].
 
Katanoetic
 Plungoform
 (single
 channel
 HD
 video
 w/
 sound;
 3
 minute
 projected
 loop;
 2011)
 is
 a
 video
  piece
 that
 twists
 the
 outside
 in
 -­-
 a
 landscape
 of
 geometrically-­-patterned
 dirty
 modernist
 blocks
 in
 Sao
  Paolo,
 Brazil,
 dissolve
 into
 underground
 oil
 formations.
 It
 collapses
 the
 Motorik
 beat,
 cheaply
 emotive
  stock-­-music,
 bass/base
 materialism,
 utopian
 dreams
 /
 non-­-human
 apocalyptic
 fantasies,
 Manon
 de
  Boer’s
 film
 on
 the
 schizoanalyst
 Suely
 Rolnik,
 anthropophagy,
 katabaticism
 and
 oil
 as
 a
 sentient
  creeping
 plotting
 entity.
 

  Mark
 Wilsher
 
  Hegel
 2012-­-
 
 
  This
 is
 the
 philosophy
 of
 Hegel
 represented
 as
 a
 high
 school-­-style
 cardboard
 model.
 Like
 a
 slightly
 batty
  teacher
 attempting
 to
 get
 the
 basics
 across,
 concepts
 are
 linked
 together
 not
 logically,
 but
 physically.
 
Shapes
 suggest
 movement
 or
 direction,
 solids
 and
 planes
 intersect
 like
 ideas.
 After
 all,
 aren’t
 ideas
 said
  to
 be
 “connected”,
 to
 “support
 each
 other”,
 to
 “lead
 from
 one
 to
 another”.
 It
 all
 makes
 sense
 –
 sort
 of.
  The
 physical
 world
 intersects
 with
 the
 mental
 world
 of
 ideas
 and
 philosophy.
 
 
 
It
 is
 actually
 possible
 to
 learn
 the
 philosophy
 of
 Hegel
 from
 this
 slightly
 wonky
 cardboard
 model.
 
 
 
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